Webinars

Online business briefing. Male African American employee speak on video call with diverse multiracial colleagues, on laptop screen diverse business people, meeting online, group brainstorm

A webinar is an online event that is hosted by an organization/company and broadcast to a select group of individuals through their computers via the Internet. Online learning opportunities have proven to be valuable for increasing access to trainings and sharing information. Participation can increase when individuals do not have to travel to trainings. Webinars generally allow participants to ask questions as they would in an in-person training. Webinars and associated training materials are posted online when completed, and can be accessed on an as-needed basis.

Webinars

WHAT

  • SMEs conduct online training that can be accessed live or reposed for on-demand usage

WHY

  • Increase participation, make information available on an ongoing basis instead of a single event

WHEN

  • Webinars are presented live to an audience but can be recorded for playback at any time.

HOW

  • Webinars require the identification of suitable topics and speakers and the marketing of the events through communications such as flyers, newsletters, and calendars.
  • Webinars may involve a single-speaker or a panel of speakers
  • Questions are posted to speakers via moderator or host and often are conveyed through questions posted by attendees through a chat function.
  • Polling activities may be used to alert speakers as to the demographics or needs of audience, or gain immediate feedback on specific points.
  • Attendees to a webinar will typically see and hear the presenters, but not be able to see or hear other attendees.

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Identify suitable online platform
  • Determine whether registration is open or by invitation
  • Develop registration materials and promotional materials
  • Coordinate with speakers as to pre-event needs and logistics on day of event

LINKS &
RESOURCES

  • New Jersey Technology Transfer Video Library (Youtube), NJDOT Technology Transfer, https://www.njdottechtransfer.net/videos

EXAMPLES

Videos

Business coaching. Management leadership. Partners recording video class with smartphone on tripod.

Videos can support knowledge transfer by providing training and instructional technical assistance, recording webinars and events, and building awareness of model or innovation practices and documenting accomplishments. Project films can visually illustrate complex topics and clarify messages where terminology can be difficult to grasp for viewers unfamiliar with the material. Films can translate issues into compelling stories to support training and education. Videos may describe how a job or task is done for employees new to a position, or can introduce an innovative practice for multiple employees in various locations. Videos can be reposed online for access when needed.

Videos

WHAT

  • Any innovation that must be adopted by employees
  • Expert interviews describing a process or practice
  • Training and educational assistance
  • Events, such as last lectures, for later viewing

WHY

  • To reinforce messages with visual content

WHEN

  • When it would be of benefit to share information that might be more easily understood in visual form

HOW

  • Films and visual media are inherently dynamic and each project will vary according to the purpose and complexity of the project.
  • Projects are developed with the client or customer typically on a project basis. An approach is determined to achieve the project objectives that considers pre-production, filming and editing needs.

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Hold interviews with subject matter experts
  • Research materials and prepare scripts
  • Document webinars, events and proceedings

LINKS & RESOURCES

EXAMPLES

Annotated Template / Guidance Document

Hand with pen over application form

Annotation of templates, outlines, plans, or other content/format guidelines provides specific instructions on items for inclusion and how to complete the template and provide documentation where necessary. The annotation instructs consultants and employees new to a position on proper document completion to ensure an accurate and consistent process among multiple users.

Annotated Template / Guidance Document

WHAT

  • Document that must be completed in a particular way has instructions embedded that can be deleted or written over. Provides detailed instruction on what elements to include and documentation needed.

WHY

  • A self-explanatory form saves time when people with experience are not available to instruct others on the use of the form
  • Ensures consistency among all users of the form
  • Saves time when all instructions are available and avoids submission of incomplete forms

WHEN

  • Standard forms used frequently would be available for use as needed

HOW

  • Posted online as a word document that is easily accessible to all users
  • Posted as an example of a document, such as a plan, with instructions for completing a comparable document

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Determine best format for template
  • Ensure that all instructions are included in the document

LINKS & RESOURCES

TBD

EXAMPLES

NJDOT Templates and Forms
NJDOT Utility Risk Assessment Plan Example

Process Documentation / Mapping

Hand marker drawing diagram scheme empty flow chart isolated on

Process documentation or process mapping describes the steps in a process, the roles and responsibilities of individuals involved in the process, and the product or products. Experts map out processes and provide supporting documentation for the illustration or map that clearly outlines steps and accountability. The maps show processes across separate functions, providing a picture of how units within an agency operate and coordinate, and documents methods for sharing knowledge. Any employee can follow the process despite the absence of key personnel.

PROCESS DOCUMENTATION / MAPPING

WHAT

  • A flow diagram that illustrates a process and identifies roles and responsibilities of various parties, and products at each step in the process.
  • A table that describes roles and responsibilities in a process

WHY

  • To ensure all employees understand a process and their role in the process, and have access to the information.
  • Provides a visual description of a process which can be easier for employees to follow.
  • Particularly useful for a detailed, multi-step process.

WHEN

  • When a detailed process must be followed by multiple individuals to ensure thoroughness.
  • Available online for access when needed

HOW

  • Experts map out process and provide supporting documentation for the map to clearly outline steps and accountability.
  • Presented as a table or flow chart.

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Map a continuous process (example: NJDOT Construction Project Completion and Close-out)
  • Map organized by distinct process phases (example: NJDOT Value Engineering Process Flow Chart)
  • Map organized by roles and process phases (example: NJDOT Designer Workflow)

LINKS & RESOURCES

TBD

EXAMPLES

NJDOT Construction Project Completion and Close-out
NJDOT Value Engineering Process Flow Chart
NJDOT Designer Workflow

Procedures Manuals

studying manual

A procedures manual provides information on a detailed process and reflects an approach that is in line with agency standards and requirements. The document is a resource for all employees, but is particularly useful for new employees, and employees new to positions within a unit, providing explicit knowledge for knowledge transfer despite retirements or departures. In an online document, changes can be made available immediately so that all users of the manual are referring to the most recent version and maintain a shared understanding of the process.

PROCEDURES MANUALS

WHAT

  • A detailed description of processes and procedures, providing step by step guidance.
  • A manual may describe roles and responsibilities and provide a flow chart of the process.

WHY

  • A manual, posted for access by all relevant personnel, ensures consistency of processes and procedures, and adherence to requirements and standards.
  • Turns tacit knowledge held by some individuals into explicit knowledge that can be accessed by all.

WHEN

  • Individuals must understand a complicated process and the process may be compromised if each step is not followed
  • Available as an online resource for access when needed

HOW

  • Compile descriptions of all relevant steps in a process or procedure.
  • A “living document,” the manual will be updated on an ongoing basis to capture new information, e.g. changes in standards, etc.

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Post the document online for access by all relevant employees.
  • Ensure all relevant employees are aware of the resources.

LINKS & RESOURCES

TBD

EXAMPLES

NJDOT Construction Procedures Manual
NJDOT Pavement Data Collection Data Quality Management Manual

Last Lecture

Audience listens lecturer at workshop in conference hall, rear view

Retiring employee, or an employee with expertise who is leaving a position, is given the opportunity to conduct a last lecture to share their experiences through a final presentation. The employee describes “what really happened” to give context, provides an example of program success or innovative process, or reflects on their experience of a particular topic to provide information that would otherwise be lost.

LAST LECTURE

WHAT

  • Retiring employees give a presentation on a program, process, or procedure that they oversaw or with which they are familiar.

WHY

·        To capture knowledge of an individual retiring or leaving a position or the agency.

·        To explain something

WHEN

  • In a staff meeting and/or lunchtime talk

HOW

  • Face to face, in a webinar, or via video.
  • The presentation should be recorded and posted for future access.

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Make the presentation relevant to employees’ experience

LINKS & RESOURCES

Knowledge Management Toolbox, Last Lecture. NJDOT Technology Transfer. Website. Retrieved at: https://www.njdottechtransfer.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/STIC-Q2-Feature-Presentation-Operations-Apprenticeship-Program.pdf

EXAMPLES

KM Toolbox: Last Lecture on Operations Apprenticeship Program

At the NJ STIC 2nd Quarter meeting, held on June 16, 2021, Michele Shapiro, Director, NJDOT Human Resources, presented on the Operations Apprenticeship Program as it relates to Strategic Workforce Development, an FHWA EDC-6 initiative. Ms. Shapiro retired from NJDOT in 2021 and her presentation serves as a Last Lecture, a knowledge sharing strategy that provides insight on a particular topic from an individual leaving an agency.
KM Toolbox: Last Lecture on Operations Apprenticeship Program

Knowledge Maps

organization hierarchy concept, business man manage complex logic of mindmap

Knowledge mapping is used to help identify sources of knowledge within an organization and build knowledge networks. The strategy is used to discover the location, form, ownership, value and use of specific knowledge and people's expertise to make better use of knowledge and identify barriers to, and gaps in, knowledge flow.  Knowledge assets can be tacit, such as an employee’s knowledge of a process, or it could be explicit, such as a project report. The mapping process can lead to documentation of tacit knowledge to fill gaps.

KNOWLEDGE MAPS

WHAT

  • Knowledge mapping identifies what each individual/role knows and their daily interactions to characterize their job functions. The map can take different forms (e.g. a network analysis map or matrix) to describe these relationships. Each employee should list any additional people within the agency they contact when a problem or issue arises. This tool is used on a case by-case basis.

WHY

  • Reduces knowledge silos and duplication of effort.
  • Identifies “go-to” people within the agency who play a critical role in knowledge transfer, to ensure continuity
  • Helps to identify knowledge barriers and gaps that slow a process or procedure.

WHEN

  • There is a need to prevent knowledge loss by understanding and building knowledge networks.

HOW

  • Sources can be identified as individuals or as employees in a particular position. Employees identify who they go to for specific information.

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Connect together all of your knowledge assets in a visual way to see what knowledge the agency unit has and where there are gaps.

LINKS & RESOURCES

TBD

EXAMPLES

Critical Incident Review / Lessons Learned

Male construction road worker holding a stop sign and directing

Focuses on finding root causes and process issues when a process, procedure, or project implementation has failed or errors have occurred. The review process supports discussion among agency staff who have knowledge of the event concerning what worked, what did not work, and why in order to make improvements. Captured lessons show experienced employees' approach to problem solving. Lessons learned can be reposed in a database or other resource to provide a history of experience that is accessible over time.

CRITICAL INCIDENT REVIEW / LESSONS LEARNED

WHAT

  • A collaborative review of a critical incident, or an error in process, procedure, or project implementation that results in a description of a more efficient way to accomplish a job, or details of how best to avoid an error.

WHY

  • To ensure that errors are not recreated.
  • The process of gathering input from multiple perspectives provides a model practice to problem solving.

WHEN

  • When a critical incident has occurred or at the conclusion of a project.

HOW

  • Include people with whom you worked and who have knowledge of the critical incident, in your unit or in other units, to gather perspectives and insights and to ensure that the lesson is accurate and useful.
  • Make lesson learned accessible to inform future practice.

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Define what constitutes a critical incident.
  • Create description of review process.

LINKS & RESOURCES

TBD

EXAMPLES

Mentoring

Hand with marker writing - Mentoring concept

A mentoring program can be an effective recruitment and retention strategy, and as such, should be supported by leadership. A mentor will be a senior staff member who functions as a coach, advisor, and teacher to a new employee or one who requests assistance and guidance in career development or personal growth within the organization. A mentor should be an individual outside of a mentee’s chain of supervision. Both mentors and mentees can benefit from the relationship. Mentors benefit from identification as a role model, and can learn from the mentee’s questions and knowledge.

NJDOT’s Women in Transportation group runs a Department-wide mentoring program to encourage the sharing of knowledge and expertise among employees to build “a stronger, more adaptive organization.”

MENTORING

WHAT

  • Mentoring occurs when senior staff act as mentors who assist individuals in working toward personal and professional goals and in gaining knowledge of the organization. Established mentoring programs can support recruitment, retention, knowledge management and workforce development.

WHY

  • Communicates knowledge of organizational culture
  • Provides a reliable contact outside the immediate work hierarchy
  • Guides individual in achieving career goals
  • Aids in retention of talent
  • Creates connections of trust within the organization

WHEN

  • Individuals may seek a mentor when they wish to advance in a career, and when they need information on “how things work”
  • Mentors listen, question, encourage, assess and help mentees develop greater professional skills to achieve personal and career goals

HOW

  • Mentors should have no performance management interest in the mentee
  • Mentoring may be effective in building stronger ties with new employees by pairing them with senior workers, thereby contributing to retention
  • Participation is voluntary
  • Goals, objectives, and developmental needs identified at outset
  • Meetings and discussions are confidential
  • Ending the relationship at any time should be acceptable
  • Mentoring programs must be supported by leadership

PRACTICE CONSIDERATIONS

  • Mentors should have no performance management interest in the mentee
  • Mentoring may be effective in building stronger ties with new employees by pairing them with senior workers, thereby contributing to retention
  • Participation is voluntary
  • Goals, objectives, and developmental needs identified at outset
  • Meetings and discussions are confidential
  • Ending the relationship at any time should be acceptable
  • Mentoring programs must be supported by leadership

LINKS & RESOURCES

TBD

EXAMPLES

Mentoring in Monroe: An Interview on NJDOT’s Commitment to Communities

We spoke with NJDOT's Dr. Venkiteela about the mentorship process, a capstone project undertaken with students at Monroe Township High School, and what the future may hold for
Mentoring in Monroe: An Interview on NJDOT’s Commitment to Communities

Exploring Strategic Workforce Development in NJ: An Interview with the Associated Construction Contractors of New Jersey

We spoke with Jill Schiff (Executive Director, Operations) and Darlene Regina (COO) of the Associated Construction Contractors of New Jersey (ACCNJ) to hear their perspective on
Exploring Strategic Workforce Development in NJ:  An Interview with the Associated Construction Contractors of New Jersey

KM Interview: Cross-Training in Construction Services

Cross-training involves teaching an employee hired for one job responsibility, to perform the functions and skills of other job responsibilities within an organization. We spoke
KM Interview: Cross-Training in Construction Services

Professional Engineering Design Experience Program Launched at NJDOT – Provides Career Opportunities toward Licensure

NJDOT recently released an interactive website dedicated solely to WIN information, providing all users with statistics, visualizations, and data downloads.
Professional Engineering Design Experience Program Launched at NJDOT – Provides Career Opportunities toward Licensure

Best Practice Meetings & Studies

Learning about successful and effective practices used by other organizations.
Learning about successful and effective practices used by other organizations.

Methods, processes, and strategies that are considered best practices will have been shown to be effective through implementation. Adoption of best practices results in time and cost savings, reduction in errors, managing risk. FHWA’s Every Day Counts initiative promotes the sharing of best practices among DOTs to support efficiency and effectiveness in deployment of new technologies.

BEST PRACTICE MEETINGS & STUDIES

WHAT

  • Best Practice Meetings & Studies describe practices that have proven successful or effective in other organizations and can be duplicated. Best practices may be adopted between units within an organization.

WHY

  • To increase efficiency and effectiveness, adopt practices that are successful in other organizations.
  • Share current practices in use within the organization.

WHEN

  • To increase efficiency and effectiveness, adopt practices that are successful in other organizations.
  • Share current practices in use within the organization.

HOW

  • Identify knowledge gaps and sources of knowledge and information. Determine the study or meeting format and content.

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Identify knowledge gaps and sources of knowledge and information. Determine the study or meeting format and content.

LINKS &
RESOURCES

TBD

EXAMPLES

Peer Exchanges create an opportunity for peers, experts, and others involved in a particular topic to exchange ideas and best practices on that topic to benefit research, development, and technology transfer programs. A Peer Exchange is a formal program required by FHWA in order to receive federal planning and research funds. A State DOT research bureau defines a topic and selects a peer exchange team that includes participants from other state DOT research programs, FHWA, universities, or other related organizations.

A state DOT can organize other Peer Exchanges to focus on topics of particular significance within the state, and invite participants from state and local agencies.

See Peer Exchange.

UAS Peer Exchange at NJDOT
UAS Peer Exchange at NJDOT

LEARN MORE

Local Safety Peer Exchanges: Summary Report

The Local Safety Peer Exchange Summary Report describes a series of peer exchange events that highlighted local initiatives that demonstrate best practice in addressing traffic
Local Safety Peer Exchanges: Summary Report